Tag Archives: reflection

Improving the Quality of Data Collected in Evaluation by Luke Spooner

NOTE: The following blog was written by Luke Spooner who was one of two recipients of the CESBCY Student Bursary Award.  Luke is a graduate student in the Faculty of Pharmacy at The University of British Columbia and a Research Assistant at Broadleaf Consulting. The second recipient was Jacob Helliwell who is pursuing an MPA at University of Victoria.  See Jacob’s blog titled: Three Reasons you Should Attend c2017: Student Edition. Continue reading

Evaluation Can Be Influential in Creating Change By Kim van der Woerd

My name is Kim van der Woerd, I’m a member of the ‘Namgis First Nation of Alert Bay, BC, and have been doing program evaluation work for over 20 years. I own and have run an all-Indigenous consulting firm called Reciprocal Consulting, for the past 14 years. I’m excited we are holding this year’s CES conference in Vancouver, the unceded homelands of the Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil Wau-tuth peoples. Continue reading

Networking at the CES Conference by Harry Cummings, President, Canadian Evaluation Society

In my long career as an evaluator I have found networking to be the most rewarding way to expand my evaluation contacts and knowledge. And the ultimate networking opportunity for Canadian evaluation work is the CES annual conference. This year we’ll be meeting in the beautiful city of Vancouver. Continue reading

Announcing the Fellows’ Plenary Panel – Pushing Forward: With or Without Evaluation by Natalie Kishchuk

The Fellowship of the Canadian Evaluation Society (CES) is made up of individuals who have been recognized by CES for their lifetime achievements, service and prominence in evaluation. Since its inception in 2003, 23 individuals have received the CES Fellowship. One of the Fellowship’s roles is to provide leadership and collective experience, including at CES national conferences. Starting in 2015, the Fellows began organizing a special strand within the conference, bringing together recognized leaders to address timely and often controversial issues in the field of evaluation.

We are delighted to announce this year’s Fellows Plenary Panel, to be held on Tuesday May 2nd, 2017. We believe it will deliver a critical, edgy perspective, and stimulate dialogue at the conference and beyond. Continue reading

Worth the Journey: Reflections on Evaluation from the other Coast by Craig Moore

Now or Never: An Urgent Call to Action for Nova Scotians, the title of a report released in 2014 by the One Nova Scotia Commission called attention for the need for “Facing Forward” in the province. “Facing Forward” in this report called for a new way of doing business in the province to ensure a sustainable future. After reading “Now or Never” I decided to move back to my home province to start using my evaluation skills to try to help wherever I am needed (see my #EvaluatorOriginStory blog post http://www.craigmoorenovascotia.com/news/nova-scotia-evaluator-origin-story/). For me this report represented a personal call to action. Continue reading

Inspiration from Marrakesh by Sarah Farina

The well-organized and visionary Francophone evaluation network (RFE) conference in Marrakesh was an inspiration for me as Co-Chair of this year’s Canadian Evaluation Society Conference.  I had the good fortune to connect with the President of host organization Moroccan Evaluation Association, Jamal Ramdane, Jean-Marie Loncle from the Francophone evaluation network, and Program Coordinator Mouna el Ghormli from the Moroccan Evaluation Association, who gracefully shared their insights on organizing a successful conference with me.  Continue reading

Get Social at CES Vancouver by Danielle Simpson

There are many academic reasons to attend CES Vancouver but the social activities will guarantee to be a highlight of your trip. Whether it is taking in the sights and sounds of beautiful Vancouver, chatting with a new acquaintance at morning exercises, or catching up with old colleagues at the evaluator dinners, this conference has something for everyone. Continue reading

Evaluation Over the Years by Kylie Hutchinson, Keynote Speaker

Some conference themes resonate with me more than others. When I saw this one I thought, “Yes!”  Innovation, action, and reflection are all things that have been on my mind lately as an evaluator. Let me tell you why.

I took my first evaluation course in 1988 and went out on my own as an independent consultant in 1998. So as you can imagine I have a few years to reflect on. My first CES conference was Toronto 1990. For years it seemed to me there was nothing new in evaluation, and probably for good reason. We were still a young, relatively new profession and everyone was busy building our reputation and seeking acceptance. Fast forward to 2005-2006 and things seemed to really take off. Now everywhere I look I see innovation being introduced into the field, and it’s very exciting. From boundary-pushing reports to previously unthinkable forms of data collection, the times they are a changin’. Sometimes it freaks me out as I try to keep up, but it’s still exciting. Continue reading

Facing Backwards to Face Forwards By Bryn Sadownik

My son is four and has been asking some really interesting questions lately.   Did someone put the moon up in the sky?   Can you turn the stars off with our light switch? From an early age, we learn about the world through questions, many of which parents can be entirely unprepared for.   If there is one thing that I want him to keep alive and refine in school is the impetus to always ask questions, to think critically and to get answers, or as close as we can to them.  Luckily this is something that we value in Canadian society.  You can even grow up to be an evaluator! (Though fire fighter, doctor and nurse are still top of his mind)

The heart of evaluation lies in critical thinking.  We are not experts in a program but we can help those who are part of it to step back, ask good questions, and uncover the answers.  Fundamentally we help people look at what they are doing in a new way. Continue reading